RelateStrong | Boone Center Programs | Boone Center for the Family | Pepperdine University

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Building Relationships for Life and Leadership

RelateStrong is for adults whose life-stage moves them beyond Boone Center's Relationship IQ program, but who aren't looking for the couples focus of MarriageStrong.


 

Why RelateStrong?

While more and more people today are waiting to marry and start a family, questions of Identity and Belonging can be a challenge for those who are single. Many in and outside the church would say they struggle to feel complete or part of a community that revolves around marriage and family. Some churches have responded by reducing their marriage and family programs so as not to alienate individuals. RelateStrong provides the answer for communities looking for a program to serve their individual adults who want to grow in their relational health with others. 

 

How it works

RelateStrong is designed to help individuals come to understand their strengths and relationship styles in the context of a small group experience. The material concentrates on teaching how to build love and trust in a healthy and engaging way. The participants learn now to understand their own conflict styles, unlearning destructive patterns while incorporating life-giving actions instead. Group participants learn to embrace their own personality styles and spiritual gifts as they connect to the body of Christ. The spiritual emphasis of learning how to live in the "new self" is extremely beneficial to those in ministry leadership positions as they work to lead and serve others effectively.


History

RelateStrong was developed in 2015 in response to the many requests from individuals who wanted to learn the information from MarriageStrong. MarriageStrong was originally designed for academic campuses to help students prepare their marriages for ministry. With many people choosing to delay marriage until after their careers are established, graduate programs are often filled with individuals rather than couples. As the program grew, many from churches and organizations expressed a need for a companion program to work with individuals.

The concepts from the foundational program are easily converted to reach an individual audience. Learning how to deal with conflict with friends, family members, and peers, teach the individual how to resolve conflict easily, understand others, and make healthy choices in relationships. The program is based on the principles of Restoration Therapy, a therapy model developed by Terry Hargrave, PhD. and Sharon Hargrave, LMFT. Taught in a psycho-educational model, the material benefits from popular psychological concepts of emotional regulation, mindfulness, and attachment. The group members learn how to find identity and safety in relationships.